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Altagamoa Al Khames, Main centre of town, end of 90th Street
New Cairo
Egypt

Salma Shamel Elsayed Nasser

Basic information

Name : Salma Shamel Elsayed Nasser
Title: Lecturer
Personal Info: Dr. Salma Nasser served as a Senior Officer in the Cabinet of the Minister of International Cooperation in Egypt for over six years. She then moved to New York where she worked at UNDP headquarters for several years. She has taught in the University of Bangkok in Thailand and Future University in Egypt. The focus areas for Dr. Salma's research and work in the academia has been political science, economic development and gender studies. She has also authored several key UN publications. Dr. Salma Nasser holds a BA in Political Science - specializing in International Law- from the American University in Cairo, Egypt; an MA in Political Science from the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan, Italy and a PhD in Development from the University of Bologna, Italy. View More...

Education

Certificate Major University Year
PhD Law and Economics Blogna - Italy 2010
Masters European Studies Catholic University 2006
Bachelor . . 2005

Teaching Experience

Name of Organization Position From Date To Date
United Nations Project Coordinator 01/01/2013 01/01/2016
University of Bangkok Lecturer 01/01/2012 01/01/2013
Cabinet of the Minister of International Cooperation International Cooperation Expert 01/01/2007 01/01/2013

Researches /Publications

Women, Conflict Management and Peace building in Africa - 01/0

Salma Shamel Elsayed Nasser

01/01/2013

In the context of growing and cogent discourses on centralising the role of psychology in preventing conflict and violence, and promoting peace across diverse contexts, this text presents as an exciting, cutting-edge contribution to the field of peace psychology.

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Women, Conflict Management and Peace building in Africa - 01/0

Salma Shamel Elsayed Nasser

01/01/2013

Africa nations over the years have been ravaged by conflict which has torn apart the social fabric and also weakened the solidarity and human characteristics of the Africa society. This has resulted in destabilization, displacement and infrastructural destruction which have gender-specific impact on the affected population. This is why accurate information on peace, conflict and gender issues is essential for well informed planning, policy making and action in order to build a culture of peace in Africa and the world at large. Women constitute majority of the world’s refugees and internally displaced persons. Protecting the world from the destructive cost of war requires not only international communities, but women also, who must work together to prevent the start and spread of violent conflict. This paper examines the root causes of conflict in Burundi at different levels, institutions and practices that propagates conflicts. The paper examines the progress made so far by women with the introduction of resolution 1325 by the United Nations Security Council. The paper identifies some needs of women that need to be met to engender post-conflict resolution and peace building in order to build a culture of peace in Africa.

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United Nations African Women's Report - 01/0

Salma Shamel Elsayed Nasser

01/01/2012

An increasing amount of research is beginning to offer a global overview of the extent of violence against women. In this paper we discuss the magnitude of some of the most common and most severe forms of violence against women: intimate partner violence; sexual abuse by non-intimate partners; trafficking, forced prostitution, exploitation of labour, and debt bondage of women and girls; physical and sexual violence against prostitutes; sex selective abortion, female infanticide, and the deliberate neglect of girls; and rape in war. There are many potential perpetrators, including spouses and partners, parents, other family members, neighbours, and men in positions of power or influence. Most forms of violence are not unique incidents but are ongoing, and can even continue for decades.

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United Nations African Women's Report - 01/0

Salma Shamel Elsayed Nasser

01/01/2012

The African Gender and Development Index as a Tool Built around international consensus and a review of existing global indices, the UNECA designed the African Gender and Development Index (AGDI) to facilitate the monitoring of Africa’s progress in the implementation of global, regional and sub regional commitments affecting women. Using both qualitative and quantitative means of data collection and analysis, the framework for measuring gender inequality under the AGDI is broadly classified into three “blocks” which reflect the totality of human development

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Institution Building in the Middle East - 01/0

Salma Shamel Elsayed Nasser

01/01/2010

“When will Middle Eastern countries democratize?” is the normative question that guided the literature on regime change in the Arab world during the 1990s. Since significant political changes but no systemic transitions have occurred, this question needs reformulation: what accounts for the persistence of Arab authoritarianism? Escaping thus from the teleological tunnel permits the identification of two major developments. The first is an oscillation between controlled political liberalizations and deliberalizations, and the second consists of five areas of change within regimes: legitimation, elites, institution building, co-optation, and regimes’ reactions to external influences. The second trend is particularly crucial for understanding the durability of authoritarianism in the Arab world.

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Institution Building in the Middle East - 01/0

Salma Shamel Elsayed Nasser

01/01/2010

“When will Middle Eastern countries democratize?” is the normative question that guided the literature on regime change in the Arab world during the 1990s. Since significant political changes but no systemic transitions have occurred, this question needs reformulation: what accounts for the persistence of Arab authoritarianism? Escaping thus from the teleological tunnel permits the identification of two major developments. The first is an oscillation between controlled political liberalizations and deliberalizations, and the second consists of five areas of change within regimes: legitimation, elites, institution building, co-optation, and regimes’ reactions to external influences. The second trend is particularly crucial for understanding the durability of authoritarianism in the Arab world.

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Boxed Women in Public Administration - Between Glass Ceilings and Glass Walls: A Study of Women 's Participation in Public Administration in the Arab States -

Salma Shamel Elsayed Nasser

Inclusive decision-making is necessary in terms of both legitimacy and good policy outcomes. Recognizing this, closing persistent gender gaps in public life has emerged as a critical policy issue as countries increase their efforts to foster inclusive growth and build trust and confidence in public institutions while working towards the SDGs. The public administration determines the manner in which political and economic decisions are implemented and how budgets are planned and spent. Additionally, it is a primary employer for women in many developing countries – particularly in the Arab world. In some countries, women have in fact surpassed parity in terms of public administration employment but still lag far behind the 30% target in leadership positions. Balanced total employment among women and men is important but it is equally important to have women dispersed throughout all the different sectors of administrative governance, as well as equitably represented in all levels of decision-making. Women tend to outnumber men in general positions and decrease significantly in number further up the grade ladder. In addition to the glass ceiling that women face in the public sector, there also appears to be a strong trend of horizontal profiling: "glass walls". Women in the public sector are primarily involved in the traditionally feminized sectors of health, education and social services and almost absent from other sectors such as security and foreign affairs. The status quo represents a challenge to achieving SDGs 5, 8 and 16 and the biggest impediment to adjusting the situation is the absence of relevant data. This paper will examine the gender gap in the public administrations of Arab countries; analyze trends and policy with the ultimate aim of contributing to the development of tracking mechanisms for gender equality in the public administration.

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Building Resilient Societies The Relevance of UNSCR 1325 in Egypt’s Political Transition -

Salma Shamel Elsayed Nasser

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 and 1820 and the more recent 1888, 1889, 1960, 2106, 2122 and 2242 reflect a rights-based approach to human security with a focus on the prevention of violence against women and girls and fostering their active and meaningful participation in public life in conflict and post conflict contexts. This is a particularly important framework in the African context where, over the past 5 years alone, conflict has plagued over 18 countries and has had devastating socio-economic impacts on women and led to the weakening of justice systems and social norms, which at the best of times secure minimum protection for women. In 2011 the North of the continent boiled over with political unrest which culminated with civil war in some countries. A notable phenomenon is that even in countries that escaped the predicament of armed conflict, women were subject to many of the same threats. As such, while UNSCR 1325 addresses the protection of women in times of armed conflict and peace building, provisions are still relevant in cases of political transition such as that of Egypt where there have been serious challenges to security, justice and accountability. The institutional framework in place for protecting women in conflict calls for their integration into the ensuing decision making process and inclusive dialogue is the only way to develop resilient and effective institutions for societies in transition. This paper will present a case study of lessons that could be learnt from UNSCR 1325 in terms of protecting women and girls from violence; ensuring the mainstreaming of gender perspectives in national policies; and increasing the participation of women in decision-making and political transition processes.

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